Articles Tagged with Cheetah Mobile

Aphria Publicly available records indicate that a class action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of investors in Cheetah Mobile (NYSE:APHA) in connection to alleged violations of securities laws by APHA. Fitapelli Kurta is interested in hearing from investors who have complaints regarding investments made in Aphria between July 17, 2018 and October 24, 2018.

The class action complaint specifically alleges that during the period in question, APHA might have provided false and/or misleading material information, and/or failed to disclose adverse material information to the public, chiefly: that certain assets recently purchased by the company in Latin America did not have proper licensure and had been overvalued; that the company’s acquisition of these assets stood to enrich APHA’s chief executive officer as well as others within the company to the detriment of its shareholders; and that consequently the company’s statements about its business, operations and prospects were false and misleading and/or had no reasonable basis. The complaint alleges that when true facts emerged in the form of a December 3, 2018 article by Hindenburg Research, alleging that the company “is part of a scheme orchestrated by a network of insiders to divert funds away from shareholders into their own pockets,” the company’s share price declined in value $1.85/share, or roughly 23.4%, closing at $6.05/share on that day.

According to the company’s website, Aphria is a public licensed medical cannabis producer, and the first such producer “to report positive cash flow from operations and the first to report positive earnings in consecutive quarters.” The company is headquartered in Leamington, Ontario with operations in British Columbia, Jamaica, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Malta, Colombia, Australia, and Argentina. It trades under the symbol APHA.

Cheetah MobilePublicly available records indicate that a class action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of investors in Cheetah Mobile (NYSE:CMCM) in connection to alleged violations of securities laws by CMCM. Fitapelli Kurta is interested in hearing from investors who have complaints regarding investments made in Cheetah Mobile between April 26, 2017 and November 27, 2018.

The class action complaint specifically alleges that during the period in question, CMCM might have provided false and/or misleading material information, and/or failed to disclose adverse material information to the public, chiefly: that the company’s apps contained features—which the company had not disclosed—which monitored when its users downloaded other apps; that the company employed the data gathered by these features to improperly assert that it had caused those downloads; that when these features were uncovered, they had the potential to result in the Cheetah Mobile’s apps being removed from the Google Play app store; and that consequently the revenues enjoyed by the company during the relevant period partially stemmed from inappropriate activities, and were thus not sustainable; and that consequently the company’s statements to the public during the relevant period were false and misleading. When BuzzFeed News issued a report on November 26, 2018 that a number of Cheetah Mobile applications contained features that tracked downloads of new apps and that the company “inappropriately claim[ed] credit for having cause this download,” the company’s stock value declined $3.32/share, or approximately 37%, over the following two days of trading, closing at $5.48/share on November 27, 2018. The complaint alleges that when true facts emerged, investors suffered losses.

According to the company’s website, Cheetah Mobile is “a leading mobile internet company dedicated to making the world smarter.” On November 26, 2018, BuzzFeed News reported that the research firm Kochava had uncovered a scheme in which “Eight apps with a total of more than 2 billion downloads in the Google Play store have been exploiting user permissions as part of an ad fraud scheme that could have stolen millions of dollars.” According to the report, seven of those eight apps were owned by Chetah Mobile; the other was owned by Kika Tech. According to the company, the scheme took advantage of a fee app developers pay, usually between 50 cents and three dollars, “to partners that help drive installations of new apps.” Kochava’s research found that the companies used a practice known as click flooding or click injection, which tracks users’ downloads of new apps and claims credit for the download, such that they would receive the fee for the installation “even when they played no role” in it. Following the story’s publication, two Cheetah Mobile apps, CM Locker and Batter Doctor, “were removed from the Google Play store,” according to BuzzFeed News.

Cheetah MobilePublicly available records indicate that a class action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of investors in Cheetah Mobile (NYSE: CMOM) in connection to alleged violations of securities laws by CMOM. Fitapelli Kurta is interested in hearing from investors who have complaints regarding investments made in Cheetah Mobile between April 26, 2017 and October 25, 2017.

The class action complaint specifically alleges that during the period in question, CMOM might have provided false and/or misleading material information, and/or failed to disclose adverse material information to the public, namely: that the company uses accounts under its control to inflate the instances of gifting occurring on Live.me; that the company made overstatements regarding its revenue; and that consequently the company’s statements to the public during the relevant period were false and misleading. The research firm Prescience Point Research Group released a report on October 26, 2017 which listed, among other findings, that roughly 55% of the reported consolidated revenue claimed by the company was nonexistent, and that it used “fake” accounts to provide gifts to others, with Cheetah Mobile’s money, on Live.me. When this news was released, the complaint alleges, CMOM declined $0.37/share, or more than 4%, ultimately closing at $8.05/share on that day, causing harm to CMOM investors.

According to the company’s website, Cheetah Mobile is “a leading mobile internet company dedicated to making the world smarter.” Its mission is to provide apps of mobile users across the world and to connect users with “personalized content powered by artificial intelligence.” It was formed in 2010 when Kingsoft Security merged with Conew Image, and its products include Clean Master, Security Master, CM Launcher, Duba Anti-Virus and Cheetah Keyboard. The company is an investor in the artificial intelligence company OrionStar.